Tag archive for teaching

5 whys and 4 negotiables

5 whys and 4 negotiables

I enjoyed Pam Lowe’s recent post about personalized learning. She asked four important questions: Why does everyone have to learn the same thing? Why can’t learners learn what they want to learn? Can learners choose their own learning tools? Why do learners have to learn…

Continue reading →

This online high school is not going to change education

This online high school is not going to change education

The headline at eSchool News reads ‘This online high school could change education’ (a slight modification of the original headline at the Santa Cruz Sentinel). Okay, I’m game. I’ll check it out… I read about the founders. I read that they’re trying to make the…

Continue reading →

4Q: The quadruple win

4Q: The quadruple win

Four big questions to ask about a lesson, unit, or activity… Deeper learning. Did it allow students to go beyond factual recall and procedural regurgitation and be creative, collaborative, critical thinkers and problem-solvers? Did it really? [If not, why not? Our graduates need to be deeper…

Continue reading →

When will the bucket tip?

When will the bucket tip?

At our local pool they recently put in a new play area. There’s a large bucket with a stream of water pouring into it, and every 15 minutes or so it reaches the tipping point, where it will flip and drench all the screaming, playing…

Continue reading →

The problem with ‘any time, any place, any path, any pace’

The problem with ‘any time, any place, any path, any pace’

In most online courses and/or ‘adaptive learning systems’ … Students do low-level work at times that are convenient. Students do low-level work from places that are convenient. Students do low-level work on their own, unique path. Students do low-level work at their own, unique pace….

Continue reading →

Why would students feel valued at school?

Why would students feel valued at school?

Without having seen the exact survey questions, here are some quick reactions I have to these data… Why on earth would students say they feel valued at school? In most schools, students are told what to do nearly every minute of every school day, are…

Continue reading →

Option B

Option B

Option A: students complete a paper (or electronic) worksheet of low-level knowledge and/or procedural skillsOption B: something else Option A: students read pages from a dry-as-toast textbook and then answer publisher-provided regurgitation questionsOption B: something else Option A: students sit quietly and take notes while…

Continue reading →

Stuff.

Stuff.

Students might publish stuff with a lot of errors. Yup. Students might not want to do stuff with a class from another place. And? Students might not collaborate letting one person do all of the stuff. Uh-huh. Students might say/do stuff that is inappropriate. So? Unfortunately,…

Continue reading →

What makes a quality STEM activity? Find out in 5 days!

What makes a quality STEM activity? Find out in 5 days!

Hope you’ll join Mike Anderson and me for our K12Online presentation on October 30!

Continue reading →

Is this what we mean by ‘close reading?’

Is this what we mean by ‘close reading?’

85 questions assigned by a high school teacher to start off To Kill A Mockingbird… Is this what we mean by ‘close reading?’ Who is this book dedicated to? How old was Jem when he broke his arm? What is Jem’s full name? Who does Scout…

Continue reading →

Can we really call it learning?

Can we really call it learning?

If a student holds on to something she read, heard, or did in class just long enough to regurgitate it back on an assessment but has little to no memory of it a few weeks later, can we really call it ‘learning?’ How much of…

Continue reading →

Suppressing students’ creativity and inquiry

Suppressing students’ creativity and inquiry

Jeff Herzberg said: What are we doing that suppresses students’ natural creativity and inquiry? And what are we doing to try and stop those things? via https://twitter.com/mcleod/status/514074648531984384

Continue reading →

When will we be ready?

When will we be ready?

We see it every day in nearly every class. The students lean way back, eyes drowsy, barely paying attention, sometimes propping their chin up with their fist… we’ll call this ‘the slouch.’ Or they’re leaning forward, spine curled over, head resting on their arm or…

Continue reading →

Which schools are the true ‘miracles?’

Which schools are the true ‘miracles?’

Let’s imagine that we lived in an era in which change was occurring incredibly rapidly. An era in which our information landscape was undergoing drastic transformations into new, previously-unimaginable forms. An era in which our economic landscape was destroying rock-solid, stable livelihoods due to threats…

Continue reading →

What would be your reasoning NOT to connect your students to the world?

What would be your reasoning NOT to connect your students to the world?

Laura Gilchrist said: Twitter allows educators to connect and interact with resources, ideas, and people from around the world. Twitter allows educators to share their stories – positive stories included. We need more positive stories because, I’m telling you, there’s a lot of good going…

Continue reading →

Thinkers v. producers

Thinkers v. producers

In How Children Fail, John Holt makes the following distinction: producers – students who are only interested in getting right answers, and who make more or less uncritical use of rules and formulae to get them thinkers – students who try to think about the…

Continue reading →

Replication or empowerment?

Replication or empowerment?

We’ve got to decide if our vision for educational technology is around replication or empowerment. And if it’s about empowerment, then guess what? We’ve got to give up the things that we do that feed replication. We can’t hang on to all of those and…

Continue reading →

‘Closed’ v. ‘open’ systems of knowing

‘Closed’ v. ‘open’ systems of knowing

I am rereading Teaching As a Subversive Activity, which is a phenomenal book if you haven’t read it. About halfway through the book, Postman and Weingartner discuss ‘closed’ versus ‘open’ systems of knowledge: A closed system is one in which the knowables are fixed. Examples…

Continue reading →

You learn the work by doing the work

You learn the work by doing the work

Cale Birk says: You learn the work by doing the work. . . . So what if we made it a primary objective in education to spend as little time as possible talking to our learners and as much time available out getting them to…

Continue reading →

Will an emphasis on ‘close reading’ kill the joy of reading?

Will an emphasis on ‘close reading’ kill the joy of reading?

As most educators know by now, the new Common Core standards emphasize ‘close reading.’ It’s hard to argue with that as a necessary skill for understanding complex writing. As a professor I spent lots of time dissecting research articles, book chapters, blog posts, and legal…

Continue reading →

Page 1 of 2 1 2